A tumblr for interesting articles, blogs, photos and websites related to anthropology.

 

nminusone:

recreated sounds of aztec whistles

A cool look at the missing soundscapes that can be recreated in archaeology. 

amnhnyc:

Laura Watson Benedict (1861–1932) was the first anthropologist to travel to the Philippines in 1906 to study the Bagobo people. In 1910, the Museum purchased Benedict’s collection of 2,534 Bagobo artifacts for $4,000 and she was hired to accession it.
Four years later, Benedict became the first woman to earn a doctorate in anthropology from Columbia University, publishing her thesis, Bagobo Ceremonial Magic and Myth, in 1916. According to anthropologist Jay H. Bernstein in a 1985 article on Benedict, her study of the Bagobo “remains a forgotten treasure of 20th-century anthropology.”
Learn more about this pioneering anthropologist. 

amnhnyc:

Laura Watson Benedict (1861–1932) was the first anthropologist to travel to the Philippines in 1906 to study the Bagobo people. In 1910, the Museum purchased Benedict’s collection of 2,534 Bagobo artifacts for $4,000 and she was hired to accession it.

Four years later, Benedict became the first woman to earn a doctorate in anthropology from Columbia University, publishing her thesis, Bagobo Ceremonial Magic and Myth, in 1916. According to anthropologist Jay H. Bernstein in a 1985 article on Benedict, her study of the Bagobo “remains a forgotten treasure of 20th-century anthropology.”

Learn more about this pioneering anthropologist

magictransistor:

The skull of a two-year-old Neanderthal child: ‘Dederiyeh 2’ (Syria); between 70,000 and 50,000 years old. Smithsonian Institution.

magictransistor:

The skull of a two-year-old Neanderthal child: ‘Dederiyeh 2’ (Syria); between 70,000 and 50,000 years old. Smithsonian Institution.

newyorker:

Adam Gopnik looks at a new theory about the origins of symbolic communication in early humans:

“The larger point is plain, and bold: symbolic communication does not just, in the end and after millennia, produce social tolerance. It is, in its first instance and of its essence, a form of social tolerance—and depends on feminized humans telling the tough guys to calm down and take a number.”

Photograph via AP

newyorker:

Adam Gopnik looks at a new theory about the origins of symbolic communication in early humans:

“The larger point is plain, and bold: symbolic communication does not just, in the end and after millennia, produce social tolerance. It is, in its first instance and of its essence, a form of social tolerance—and depends on feminized humans telling the tough guys to calm down and take a number.”

Photograph via AP

interestos:

A new study says our ancestors may have co-existed with Neanderthals for thousands of years. It also suggests the arrival of modern humans in Europe wasn’t the reason for the Neanderthals’ extinction.
(via BBC News)

The saga continues!

interestos:

A new study says our ancestors may have co-existed with Neanderthals for thousands of years. It also suggests the arrival of modern humans in Europe wasn’t the reason for the Neanderthals’ extinction.

(via BBC News)

The saga continues!

amnhnyc:

Today’s peek into the archives takes us back to the Museum in 1910. “Sigurd Neandross painting figure in Haida ceremonial canoe, North Pacific Hall” was photographed by Thomas Lunt. 
The Great Canoe has since been moved to the Museum’s Grand Gallery. At 63 feet long, the seaworthy Great Canoe is one of the Museum’s most popular artifacts. It was carved in the 1870s from the trunk of a single cedar tree, and features design elements from different Native American peoples of the Northwest Coast, notably Haida and Heiltsuk. 
Learn more about the history of the Great Canoe.
AMNH/33006

Every once in a long while someone will ask where these guys went. It’s an empty canoe now, but still a stunner!

amnhnyc:

Today’s peek into the archives takes us back to the Museum in 1910. “Sigurd Neandross painting figure in Haida ceremonial canoe, North Pacific Hall” was photographed by Thomas Lunt.

The Great Canoe has since been moved to the Museum’s Grand Gallery. At 63 feet long, the seaworthy Great Canoe is one of the Museum’s most popular artifacts. It was carved in the 1870s from the trunk of a single cedar tree, and features design elements from different Native American peoples of the Northwest Coast, notably Haida and Heiltsuk.

Learn more about the history of the Great Canoe.

AMNH/33006

Every once in a long while someone will ask where these guys went. It’s an empty canoe now, but still a stunner!

1956- Gordon Parks documented the everyday lives of an extended black family living in rural Alabama under Jim Crow segregation for Life magazine’s photo-essay “The Restraints: Open and Hidden.” (via)

(Source: vintagegal)

ancientart:

The petroglyphs in the landscape of Tamgaly, Kazakhstan, dating from approximately 1400 BCE to the 20th century.

Offering us unique insight into the rituals and social organization of the pastoral peoples who inhabited this site through time, the archaeological landscape of Tamgaly contains about 5,000 petroglyphs (rock carvings), which are distributed throughout 48 complexes largely associated with burial grounds and settlements.

The central canyon has the densest concentration of petroglyphs, contains ‘alters,’ and has been interpreted to have had ritual significance. The central canyon is devoid of dwellings, and is thought to have been a place for sacrificial offerings.

During the Middle Bronze Age we see Tamgaly-type petroglyphs, which include zoomorphic beings, people, a huge variety of animals, and ‘solar deities (sun-heads).’ During the Late Bronze Age the petroglyphs become smaller in size, and display less variety in what is depicted. Here scenes of pastoral life are popular, reflecting the prominence of nomadic cattle breeding activities during the time. During the Early Iron Age, scenes showing the hunting of wild animals remain present, but we also see camels starting to appear in the art.

If you are interested in reading more about the ‘solar-headed’ petroglyphs I would recommend The Archaeology of Shamanism (2001, Routledge), specifically chapter 5. This publication is edited by Neil Price, professor of archaeology at the University of Aberdeen, who is a specialist on shamanism in archaeology.

The petroglyphs within the archaeological landscape of Tamgaly are listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site -their article on the landscape was of great use to me while writing up this post. Photos courtesy of & taken by Ken and Nyetta.

in-the-horniman:

These swords from the Gilbert Islands, Kiribati, are made from wood and have sharks’ teeth attached along the edges.