A tumblr for interesting articles, blogs, photos and websites related to anthropology.

 

lafemmederaisin:

Re-purposing material can be fun.  Just take this black and white printed fabric for example.  It used to be a bed skirt that sat and sat and sat in a pile of other unused linens.  Now it’s several Plush Archaeology kits and Plush Archaeology totes.  Look up my store AnthroEstranged on Etsy and check out all my goodies.
https://www.etsy.com/shop/AnthroEstranged?ref=si_shop

This is too adorable. I have TWO archaeology friends having babies soon, this might have to be bought in bulk… 

lafemmederaisin:

Re-purposing material can be fun.  Just take this black and white printed fabric for example.  It used to be a bed skirt that sat and sat and sat in a pile of other unused linens.  Now it’s several Plush Archaeology kits and Plush Archaeology totes.  Look up my store AnthroEstranged on Etsy and check out all my goodies.

https://www.etsy.com/shop/AnthroEstranged?ref=si_shop

This is too adorable. I have TWO archaeology friends having babies soon, this might have to be bought in bulk… 

amnhnyc:

Today’s peek into the archives shows the arrival of the Willamette Meteorite to the Museum in 1906. 

Weighing 15.5 tons, this iron meteorite is the largest ever found in the United States and the sixth-largest in the world. The smooth surface melted during its blazing entry into the atmosphere, while the pits formed on the Earth’s surface.

The Willamette Meteorite was originally located within the Upper Willamette Valley of Oregon. It was revered as a spiritual being that has healed and empowered the people of the valley by the Clackamas Indians who occupied the region. 

Learn more about the formation of the Willamette Meteorite, and about its cultural significance

AMNH/2A9703 and AMNH/31498 from the Museum’s Online Digital Special Collections.

The meteorite is currently revered by the modern day descendants of the Clackamas.

This isn’t secret information- honoring the Willamette Meteorite agreement involves shutting down the entire planetarium building for a private ceremony held by a tribal delegation for the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde once a year. The museum also hosts Grand Ronde interns who provide information about the cultural significance of the meteorite to the public around the time of the ceremony. They just finished this year’s delegation.

strangeremains:

Skull, found in France, with a knife still embedded it it.  The skull belonged to a Roman solider who died during the Gallic Wars, ca. 52BC. It was on display at the Museo Rocsen in Argentina.  

strangeremains:

Skull, found in France, with a knife still embedded it it.  The skull belonged to a Roman solider who died during the Gallic Wars, ca. 52BC. It was on display at the Museo Rocsen in Argentina.  

(Source: derwiduhudar)

English is too fun to box in, and Shakespeare would agree. 

With all the buzz over Weird Al’s new video, I felt the need to share again Stephen Fry’s wonderful take on the joys of not caring about grammar. Descriptivists unite! 

Why did Greek warriors go to war wearing what today looks like a linen mini-dress?
Follower livefromtheloam sent me this nifty story of folks from the University of Wisconsin taking their lives into their own hands by testing the linen armor worm by the ancient Greeks.
Nothing like some experimental archaeology to find that perfect summer dress that can both flatter your thighs and stop an arrow in its tracks.
Click the title for more info and a video laying out the how-to (though you probably shouldn’t try this at home). Thanks loam!

Why did Greek warriors go to war wearing what today looks like a linen mini-dress?

Follower livefromtheloam sent me this nifty story of folks from the University of Wisconsin taking their lives into their own hands by testing the linen armor worm by the ancient Greeks.

Nothing like some experimental archaeology to find that perfect summer dress that can both flatter your thighs and stop an arrow in its tracks.

Click the title for more info and a video laying out the how-to (though you probably shouldn’t try this at home). Thanks loam!

thingsilearnedfrommoocs:

Learning to cook made humanity smarter.  
The invention of cooking allowed the body to use fewer resources in eating and digesting food. The digestive tract shrank, and the brain grew. Primates usually spend half the day chewing tough raw food, but we don’t need to, so early humans could spend the time on other things.
Learned at: A Brief History of Humankind (Hebrew University of Jerusalem/Coursera)
Extra credit: Invention of cooking drove evolution of the human species, new book argues (Harvard Gazette, 2009)

Follow the link for a neat looking “history of nearly everything” type online course. Note: I haven’t participated, but I thought it looked interesting. It could be full of crazy, I have no idea.
The above fact is one of my favorites, yay cooking!

thingsilearnedfrommoocs:

Learning to cook made humanity smarter.  

The invention of cooking allowed the body to use fewer resources in eating and digesting food. The digestive tract shrank, and the brain grew. Primates usually spend half the day chewing tough raw food, but we don’t need to, so early humans could spend the time on other things.

Learned at: A Brief History of Humankind (Hebrew University of Jerusalem/Coursera)

Extra credit: Invention of cooking drove evolution of the human species, new book argues (Harvard Gazette, 2009)

Follow the link for a neat looking “history of nearly everything” type online course. Note: I haven’t participated, but I thought it looked interesting. It could be full of crazy, I have no idea.

The above fact is one of my favorites, yay cooking!

in-the-horniman:

Thanks for all of your guesses on Stick of the Week! Many of you were in the right area…this stick IS used for hunting. But it is not an atlatl (throwing spear). It is a springhare hook.
Springhares are small burrowing African rodents. The hook is extended into the springhare’s burrow and used to kill the animal. Extra lengths are added if necessary to accommodate the depth of the burrow. The number of lengths needed to reach the springhare is then counted, and this is used to calculate where the hunters need to dig to reach their prize.
However, this object was originally in one piece, and our records say that it was cut into three pieces for ease of transport! It was acquired by the Horniman in 1978.

Well now we know.

in-the-horniman:

Thanks for all of your guesses on Stick of the Week! Many of you were in the right area…this stick IS used for hunting. But it is not an atlatl (throwing spear). It is a springhare hook.

Springhares are small burrowing African rodents. The hook is extended into the springhare’s burrow and used to kill the animal. Extra lengths are added if necessary to accommodate the depth of the burrow. The number of lengths needed to reach the springhare is then counted, and this is used to calculate where the hunters need to dig to reach their prize.

However, this object was originally in one piece, and our records say that it was cut into three pieces for ease of transport! It was acquired by the Horniman in 1978.

Well now we know.

amnhnyc:

Three-dimensional scans of two mummified newborn woolly mammoths recovered from the Siberian Arctic are revealing previously inaccessible details about the early development of prehistoric proboscideans. The research, conducted in part by American Museum of Natural History Richard Gilder Graduate School student Zachary T. Calamari, also suggest that both animals died from suffocation after inhaling mud. The findings were published July 8 in a special issue of the Journal of Paleontology.

“These two exquisitely preserved baby mammoths are like two snapshots in time,” said Calamari, who began investigating mammoths as an undergraduate at the University of Michigan working with paleontologist Daniel Fisher. “We can use them to understand how factors like location and age influenced the way mammoths grew into the huge adults that captivate us today.” 

Learn more. 

Currently teaching a class on Neanderthal extinction, and the mummified wooly mammoths keep coming up, so this is anthropological enough for me. So cool! Can’t wait to show my students!

in-the-horniman:

It’s time for Stick of the Week again! Any ideas what this three-part object is?

If I’m not mistaken, we’re looking at three parts of a atlatl (throwing spear). To be fair I was just using one today, so I might have atlatl on the brain. My followers have any suggestions?

in-the-horniman:

It’s time for Stick of the Week again! Any ideas what this three-part object is?

If I’m not mistaken, we’re looking at three parts of a atlatl (throwing spear). To be fair I was just using one today, so I might have atlatl on the brain. My followers have any suggestions?