A tumblr for interesting articles, blogs, photos and websites related to anthropology.

 

Once the line to humanity has been crossed, eating the dead is as much a ritual act as burying them, for both - like the Javanese fear of hungry witches - are merely different cultural ways of dealing with the problem that fellow humans are made of meat.

Dancing on the Grave - Nigel Barley (via anthmusings)

Prehistoric pit discovered on Coney Island beach

archaeologicalnews:

image

Archaeologists have discovered signs of human habitation, possibly dating back 4,000 years, on Sligo’s Coney Island.

A box-like structure built from large stone slabs found on the island may have been used for bathing or cooking during the Bronze Age, experts believe. It has been excavated by…

Hey hey, its my hometown!

Stonehenge secrets revealed by underground map

archaeologicalnews:

image

Archaeologists have unveiled the most detailed map ever produced of the earth beneath Stonehenge and its surrounds.

They combined different instruments to scan the area to a depth of three metres, with unprecedented resolution.

Early results suggest that the iconic monument did not stand…

New underwater technology explores Byzantine past

archaeologicalnews:

image

Underwater archaeological work in the Mediterranean has uncovered the remains of a port from the Bronze Age, along with 12 shipwrecks estimated to be 2,500 years old.

The remains of these finds are being examined at Selçuk University’s Research Center, which is working to discover the…

nminusone:

recreated sounds of aztec whistles

A cool look at the missing soundscapes that can be recreated in archaeology. 

amnhnyc:

Laura Watson Benedict (1861–1932) was the first anthropologist to travel to the Philippines in 1906 to study the Bagobo people. In 1910, the Museum purchased Benedict’s collection of 2,534 Bagobo artifacts for $4,000 and she was hired to accession it.
Four years later, Benedict became the first woman to earn a doctorate in anthropology from Columbia University, publishing her thesis, Bagobo Ceremonial Magic and Myth, in 1916. According to anthropologist Jay H. Bernstein in a 1985 article on Benedict, her study of the Bagobo “remains a forgotten treasure of 20th-century anthropology.”
Learn more about this pioneering anthropologist. 

amnhnyc:

Laura Watson Benedict (1861–1932) was the first anthropologist to travel to the Philippines in 1906 to study the Bagobo people. In 1910, the Museum purchased Benedict’s collection of 2,534 Bagobo artifacts for $4,000 and she was hired to accession it.

Four years later, Benedict became the first woman to earn a doctorate in anthropology from Columbia University, publishing her thesis, Bagobo Ceremonial Magic and Myth, in 1916. According to anthropologist Jay H. Bernstein in a 1985 article on Benedict, her study of the Bagobo “remains a forgotten treasure of 20th-century anthropology.”

Learn more about this pioneering anthropologist

magictransistor:

The skull of a two-year-old Neanderthal child: ‘Dederiyeh 2’ (Syria); between 70,000 and 50,000 years old. Smithsonian Institution.

magictransistor:

The skull of a two-year-old Neanderthal child: ‘Dederiyeh 2’ (Syria); between 70,000 and 50,000 years old. Smithsonian Institution.

newyorker:

Adam Gopnik looks at a new theory about the origins of symbolic communication in early humans:

“The larger point is plain, and bold: symbolic communication does not just, in the end and after millennia, produce social tolerance. It is, in its first instance and of its essence, a form of social tolerance—and depends on feminized humans telling the tough guys to calm down and take a number.”

Photograph via AP

newyorker:

Adam Gopnik looks at a new theory about the origins of symbolic communication in early humans:

“The larger point is plain, and bold: symbolic communication does not just, in the end and after millennia, produce social tolerance. It is, in its first instance and of its essence, a form of social tolerance—and depends on feminized humans telling the tough guys to calm down and take a number.”

Photograph via AP

interestos:

A new study says our ancestors may have co-existed with Neanderthals for thousands of years. It also suggests the arrival of modern humans in Europe wasn’t the reason for the Neanderthals’ extinction.
(via BBC News)

The saga continues!

interestos:

A new study says our ancestors may have co-existed with Neanderthals for thousands of years. It also suggests the arrival of modern humans in Europe wasn’t the reason for the Neanderthals’ extinction.

(via BBC News)

The saga continues!

amnhnyc:

Today’s peek into the archives takes us back to the Museum in 1910. “Sigurd Neandross painting figure in Haida ceremonial canoe, North Pacific Hall” was photographed by Thomas Lunt. 
The Great Canoe has since been moved to the Museum’s Grand Gallery. At 63 feet long, the seaworthy Great Canoe is one of the Museum’s most popular artifacts. It was carved in the 1870s from the trunk of a single cedar tree, and features design elements from different Native American peoples of the Northwest Coast, notably Haida and Heiltsuk. 
Learn more about the history of the Great Canoe.
AMNH/33006

Every once in a long while someone will ask where these guys went. It’s an empty canoe now, but still a stunner!

amnhnyc:

Today’s peek into the archives takes us back to the Museum in 1910. “Sigurd Neandross painting figure in Haida ceremonial canoe, North Pacific Hall” was photographed by Thomas Lunt.

The Great Canoe has since been moved to the Museum’s Grand Gallery. At 63 feet long, the seaworthy Great Canoe is one of the Museum’s most popular artifacts. It was carved in the 1870s from the trunk of a single cedar tree, and features design elements from different Native American peoples of the Northwest Coast, notably Haida and Heiltsuk.

Learn more about the history of the Great Canoe.

AMNH/33006

Every once in a long while someone will ask where these guys went. It’s an empty canoe now, but still a stunner!