A tumblr for interesting articles, blogs, photos and websites related to anthropology.

 

Use satellite technology combined with a massive online data base to explore one of the riches archaeological site in the American South West. The Chaco Research Archive allows casual visitors and academics alike explore downtown Chaco and nearby sites in room by room detail, exploring how the site was laid out and examining photos of what was found within. 

You can also click "Query the Database" to get lists of every artifact, ecofact, and feature found in the canyon, from famed turquoise covered pottery to corn kernels found in preserved Aztec poop (lucky intern that found that one). See firsthand how researchers are using digital database to build a greater understanding of daily life for a little understood culture 1500 years ago. 

aboutfacesoulrace asked
Would it be possible to analyze my features to see where might ethnically I am from geneticlly? Please? :)

From just looking at you? Short answer: No.

Anthropology has moved far away from its early days of creating neat categories of human based on superficial features. Partly because its deeply problematic, but mostly because it just doesn’t work. Features we think are important end up cropping up in other parts of the globe. And while having an epicanthic fold might indicate your have ancestors from east Asia, or having a large amount of melanin might indicate recent African ancestry, odds are if you don’t already know, people won’t be able to guess. 

That being said, the wonders of 21st century genetics mean you can look at your genes and find out roughly where your ancestors came from with simple home tests. The National Geographic-organized Genographic project has teamed up with Spencer Wells to collect human DNA samples from across the globe. If you send out for a kit, your genes will be added to the bank and you’ll be given genetic report, informing you about your ancestry and how it fits into the story of man as we currently know it. Others have participated in 23andMe, which gives similar results, but I’ve heard better things about the Genographic reports. 

If you end up getting a report, let me know how it turns out! The ones I’ve seen have held a few surprises :)

A Linguist Explains the Grammar of Doge. Wow.
Funny and suprisingly informative article exploring how linguists approach language and shifts in dialect using doge as an example from the field: 


Doge speak is clearly composed of subunits which are divided by a period in running text, which I’m going to calldoge phrases. The period is optional in images, but in that case the phrases are scattered artistically around the picture. Here are some examples of doge phrases:
such drift
much dignity
very leeder
many robe
much infinity
so gif
very guitar
such fall
so trick
much feels
very sad
many happy
such pbs
very art
There are also a smaller number of single-word doge phrases, chiefly:
wow
amaze
excite
A minimal doge utterance contains at least two but often three 2-word doge phrases, followed by a single-word doge phrase (most commonly wow). Additional phrases and variants can be added, especially for the sake of cultural references, such as can’t believe it’s not doge or dogeway to heaven but they are not what makes an utterance recognizably doge.

Wow. Such anthropology. Much learn. 
Am I doing this right? We’ll have to wait for the official ethnography to truly know.  

A Linguist Explains the Grammar of Doge. Wow.

Funny and suprisingly informative article exploring how linguists approach language and shifts in dialect using doge as an example from the field: 

Doge speak is clearly composed of subunits which are divided by a period in running text, which I’m going to calldoge phrases. The period is optional in images, but in that case the phrases are scattered artistically around the picture. Here are some examples of doge phrases:

  • such drift
  • much dignity
  • very leeder
  • many robe
  • much infinity
  • so gif
  • very guitar
  • such fall
  • so trick
  • much feels
  • very sad
  • many happy
  • such pbs
  • very art

There are also a smaller number of single-word doge phrases, chiefly:

  • wow
  • amaze
  • excite

A minimal doge utterance contains at least two but often three 2-word doge phrases, followed by a single-word doge phrase (most commonly wow). Additional phrases and variants can be added, especially for the sake of cultural references, such as can’t believe it’s not doge or dogeway to heaven but they are not what makes an utterance recognizably doge.

Wow. Such anthropology. Much learn. 

Am I doing this right? We’ll have to wait for the official ethnography to truly know.  

valdanderthal:

Somaliland declared independence after the overthrow of Somalia’s long-serving President Siad Barre in 1991. In the last years of his rule tens of thousands of people were killed there and towns were flattened following a rebellion. Now the graves of some of the victims are being excavated. 

In a grave site in the Somaliland capital of Hargeisa, an excavation is taking place as part of an effort by international student from a Peru-based forensic anthropology team, Equipo Peruino de Antropologia Forense (EPAF). 

BBC-News in Pictures 

sauropodwhat:

archaeoblogs:

Toward a Dynamic—and Virtual—Public ArchaeologySource: http://bit.ly/1b9ODwx (image)In my mind, public archaeology involves reaching out and interacting with different audiences, ranging from those with little knowledge of what archaeology actually is (no, I don’t dig up dinosaurs—yes, I think dinosaurs are cool) to individuals whose passion and skills for archaeology rival or exceed my own. Until recently, my interaction with the public has largely been face to face, via public lectures, working with volunteers in the field and laboratory, and conducting hands-on workshops. Public lectures are a great way to reach an interested audience—and students who………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project


Digital archaeology has been floating around work recently, I’d love to find out more. 

sauropodwhat:

archaeoblogs:

Toward a Dynamic—and Virtual—Public Archaeology
Source: http://bit.ly/1b9ODwx

(image)In my mind, public archaeology involves reaching out and interacting with different audiences, ranging from those with little knowledge of what archaeology actually is (no, I don’t dig up dinosaurs—yes, I think dinosaurs are cool) to individuals whose passion and skills for archaeology rival or exceed my own. Until recently, my interaction with the public has largely been face to face, via public lectures, working with volunteers in the field and laboratory, and conducting hands-on workshops. Public lectures are a great way to reach an interested audience—and students who………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Digital archaeology has been floating around work recently, I’d love to find out more. 

Test you ability to tell languages apart and learn the sounds of some rarely heard ones in the fun & challenging Great Language Game. 
My highest score was 900! (Although I got lucky getting French twice). How high can you go?

Test you ability to tell languages apart and learn the sounds of some rarely heard ones in the fun & challenging Great Language Game

My highest score was 900! (Although I got lucky getting French twice). How high can you go?

It began with a curiosity about why the ten most common verbs in the English language are irregular, even though the vast majority of verbs are regular. Their discovery, arrived at through data-mining several centuries’ worth of texts, amounts to a sort of linguistic natural selection: the more frequently an irregular verb is used, the less likely it is to be regularized over time. It was the Ngram Viewer, and access to Google’s vast library of digitized books, that enabled this discovery.

Mark O’Connell reads “Uncharted: Big Data as a Lens on Human Culture,” a new book by the scientists Erez Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel, founders of the field they call “culturomics”: http://nyr.kr/OBr9bg (via newyorker)

Nifty!

Chaupadi: When women in Nepal are pushed out of their homes in the name of tradition

Click though to see a great gallery on women affected by menstrual isolation in Nepal, and what young women are doing to combat the practice. 

Getting Used to Getting Around in Bogotá

oupacademic:

Luis Vivanco discusses the difficulty of bringing your family on field work and helping them adjust to culture shock.